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  • Aflatoxin 02/02/2011
    Aflatoxins are toxins produced by a mold that grows in nuts, seeds, and legumes. Function: Although aflatoxins are known to cause cancer in animals, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows them at low levels in nuts, seeds, and legumes because they are considered "unavoidable contaminants." The FDA believes occasionally eating small amounts of aflatoxin poses little risk over a lifetime. It is not practical to attempt to remove aflatoxin from food products in order to make them safer.
  • Age-appropriate diet for children 09/21/2011
    Diet - age appropriate Function: Food Sources: Side Effects: Recommendations: BIRTH TO 4 MONTHS OF AGE During the first 4 - 6 months of life, infants need only breast milk or formula to meet all their nutritional needs. If breastfeeding , a newborn may need to nurse 8 - 12 times per day (every 2 - 4 hours), or on demand.
  • Breast milk - pumping and storing 09/13/2011
    Pumping and storing breast milk allows you to have a supply of milk for your baby when it is needed. This can be a good option for moms who return to work after having a baby. Keeping up a supply of breast milk can be a challenge for moms who return to work outside the home. You will need to pump and collect breast milk during the day while at the office. Proper planning, support, and the correct equipment can help you continue to breastfeed, even after returning to work outside the home.
  • Breastfeeding 09/13/2011
    Deciding to breastfeed is a decision only you can make. It deserves careful thought. Experts agree that breastfeeding your baby for any length of time, no matter how short it is, will provide rewards for both you and your baby. Breast milk is the natural food source for infants younger than 1 year. Breastfeeding may take time and practice. However, with help from nurses, breastfeeding experts, your doctor, or support groups, you can enjoy the benefits and rewards of breastfeeding.
  • Breastfeeding - self-care 09/13/2011
    Nursing mothers - self-care Function: Food Sources: Side Effects: Recommendations: BREASTFEEDING DAILY FOOD GUIDE In general, breastfeeding women should eat a well-balanced, varied diet.
  • Breastfeeding tips 09/13/2011
    Breastfeeding positions Function: Proper nipple care, positioning, appropriate nursing frequency, and other measures can prevent many common breastfeeding problems . Food Sources: Side Effects: Recommendations: Most women's breasts have nipples that stick out (protrude) slightly at rest and become erect when stimulated, as with cold. During pregnancy, the nipple and the pigmented area around it (areola) thicken in preparation for breastfeeding .
  • Caffeine in the diet 05/05/2011
    Diet - caffeine Function: Caffeine is absorbed and passes quickly into the brain. It does not collect in the bloodstream or get stored in the body. It leaves the body in the urine many hours after it has been consumed.
  • Calcium in diet 02/14/2011
    Diet - calcium Function: Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the the human body. Calcium helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. Proper levels of calcium over a lifetime can help prevent osteoporosis . Calcium helps your body with: Building strong bones and teeth Clotting blood Sending and receiving nerve signals Squeezing and relaxing muscles Releasing hormones and other chemicals Keeping a normal heartbeat Food Sources: CALCIUM AND DAIRY PRODUCTS Many foods contain calcium, but dairy products are the best source.
  • Carbohydrates 05/16/2012
    Starches; Simple sugars; Sugars; Complex carbohydrates; Diet - carbohydrates; Simple carbohydrates Function: The primary function of carbohydrates is to provide energy for the body, especially the brain and the nervous system. An enzyme called amylase helps break down carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar), which is used for energy by the body.
  • Celiac disease - nutritional considerations 02/19/2012
    Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, or sometimes oats (including medications). When a person with celiac disease eats or drinks anything containing gluten, the immune system responds by damaging the lining of the intestinal tract. This damage affects the body's ability to absorb nutrients. For specific information about the disease (including symptoms and treatment), see: Celiac disease .
  • Chloride in diet 02/15/2011
    Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. It is an important part of the salt found in many foods and used in cooking. Function: Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids. It is an essential part of digestive (stomach) juices. Food Sources: Chloride is found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods with higher amounts of chloride include seaweed, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, celery, and olives.
  • Chromium in diet 03/02/2011
    Diet - chromium Function: Chromium is important in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates . Chromium stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium is also important in the breakdown (metabolism) of insulin. Food Sources: The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast, but many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes abdominal distention (a bloated feeling) and nausea .
  • Cooking utensils and nutrition 05/05/2011
    Cooking utensils can have an effect on nutrition. Function: Utensils that are used to cook food often do more than just hold the food. Molecules of substances can leach from the utensil into the food that is being cooked. Common materials used in cookware and utensils are: Aluminum Copper Iron Lead Stainless steel Teflon (polytetrafluoroethlyene) Both lead and copper have been linked to illness. Food Sources: Cooking utensils can affect any cooked foods.
  • Copper in diet 03/02/2011
    Diet - copper Function: Copper, along with iron, helps in the formation of red blood cells. It also helps in keeping the blood vessels, nerves, immune system, and bones healthy. Food Sources: Oysters and other shellfish , whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, and organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet.
  • Cow's milk - infants 08/02/2011
    Cow's milk - infants Recommendations: Cow's milk is not recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for children under 1 year old. Infants fed whole cow's milk don't get enough vitamin E , iron , and essential fatty acids. They also get too much protein , sodium, and potassium. These levels may be too high for the infant's system to handle. Also, whole cow's milk protein and fat are more difficult for an infant to digest and absorb. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life.
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