Public Service - Giving Back

In North Carolina’s Western region, the annual “Smoky Streak” charity race at MedWest-Harris in Sylva, attracted some 250 participants in October, with proceeds used to help fund new digital mammography units. More than $23,000 was raised by this year's “Power of Pink race at MedWest-Haywood in Clyde. The money provides free mammograms to Haywood County women who lack adequate health insurance. In Eastern North Carolina, the pastoral care program at Columbus Regional Healthcare System in Whiteville, provided 50 Thanksgiving dinners through Meals on Wheels.

CHS employees also made substantial contributions to community benefit through a combination of individual philanthropy and public service. In 2010, for example, employees in the greater Charlotte area collectively donated nearly $4 million to local charities through annual giving campaigns, including:

Arts and Culture organizations in Mecklenburg,
Cabarrus, Lincoln and Union counties………                              $    507,425
Children’s Miracle Network…………………….                              $ 1,043,291
CMC-NorthEast Foundation…………………….                             $    232,000
United Way………………………………………                            $ 2,004,955

Additionally, employees contributed more than 50,000 hours of volunteer service to local charities, an in-kind contribution worth more than $2 million. Key service projects included collecting 12,000 pounds of school supplies and books for disadvantaged children and collecting 65,000 pounds of food for local organizations in Mecklenburg, Cabarrus, Gaston, Iredell, Lincoln, Rowan, Union and York counties.

Other “holiday cheer” projects included serving meals, planning special events, and distributing gifts to children, seniors, and homeless, impacting the lives of some 3,000 families in Mecklenburg, Cabarrus, Gaston, Lincoln and Union counties. More than $15,000 was donated to Salvation Army, Crisis Assistance Ministry and Second Harvest Food Bank.

CHS worked aggressively in 2010 to match at-risk patients with a continuing source of primary care, thus freeing up emergency departments to handle the most seriously ill and injured patients. The CMC clinic program not only conserves healthcare dollars but promotes public health by preventing routine ailments from becoming more serious.